Home Tags Posts tagged with "Dragon Skin"

Dragon Skin Armor

Announced on Aug 3, the US Department of Justice has decided to decertify Pinnacle Inc’s Dragon Skin personal body armor.

The Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP) announced today that it has determined that the Pinnacle Armor, Inc. bulletproof vest model SOV 2000.1/MIL3AF01, is not in compliance with the requirements of OJP’s National Institute of Justice (NIJ) voluntary compliance testing program for bullet-resistant body armor. Effective immediately, this body armor model will be removed from the NIJ list of bullet-resistant body armor models that satisfy its requirements. Pinnacle Armor, Inc. is the maker of “dragon skin” body armor.

NIJ, OJP’s research, development, and evaluation component, has reviewed evidence provided by the body armor manufacturer and has determined that the evidence is insufficient to demonstrate that the body armor model will maintain its ballistic performance over its six-year declared warranty period.

This is a severe blow to Pinnacle’s campaign to have Dragon Skin fielded by the US Army and put into service in combat. Pinnacle had previously used NIJ certification as evidence that Dragon Skin is of sufficient quality to be used in combat. That line of argument is now taken away. For the record, NIJ certification standards and Army certification standards are not identical, so that line of argument was always a bit of a red herring.

Pinnacle calls the DoJ’s move “unprecedented” and says that it’s working with DoJ to resolve the warranty issue.

Since we aired that story, it’s become evident to me that NBC’s Lisa Meyers allowed herself and her network to be used by Pinnacle in a disinformation campaign designed to tout Dragon Skin and undermine confidence in the Army’s honesty and its ability to conduct fair and open laboratory tests. That campaign included getting coverage favorable to Dragon Skin on not only NBC, but on at least two other networks, the Military Network and the History Channel, on the shows Future Weapons and Mail Call respectively. Both shows attract pro-military audiences, and both shows tested Dragon Skin and touted its capabilities.

Dragon skin bullet proof vest

The Army’s struggle to find a new, more flexible body armor was dealt a setback Friday when a California company’s high tech Dragon Skin vests failed to pass military testing, a senior defense official said.

After three days of testing this week, the Army determined that the body armor does not meet military specifications, said the official, who declined to specify which tests the armor failed. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the results have not yet been released. The Army paid about $170,000, to buy 30 sets of the armor for the testing.

Generally, during testing, various types of ammunition are fired at the vests, and the armor may also be subjected to extreme temperatures or environmental conditions. The tests were done by H.P. White, an independent ballistic testing lab in Street, Maryland.

The Army has expressed great interest in getting more flexible body armor. One of the key complaints about the armor used by troops on the battlefield is that it is too heavy and inflexible, and may lessen a soldier’s speed and agility. The current armor includes heavy ceramic plates in the front, back and sides.

The Dragon Skin testing was initially delayed because of a dispute over testing conditions between the Army and Pinnacle Armor of Fresno, Calif., which makes the protective gear known as Dragon Skin.

Earlier this week, the Army announced it would conduct three days of testing, signaling the dispute’s resolution.

A request for comment from Murray Neal, Pinnacle Armor’s chief executive officer, was not immediately returned.

Neal, however, has previously contended that his armor is high quality and its “capabilities have been proven to be significant improvements over the current Army issue.”

He said he has nine years of ballistic data, both classified and unclassified, that show the armor taking over 40 rounds of ammunition from an AK-47, then another 150 rounds from a submachine gun, all at close range without any failure.

Dragon Skin Tested

The Army’s struggle to find a new, more flexible body armor was dealt a setback Friday when a California company’s high tech Dragon Skin vests failed to pass military testing, a senior defense official said.

After three days of testing this week, the Army determined that the body armor does not meet military body armor specifications, said the official, who declined to specify which tests the armor failed. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the results have not yet been released. The Army paid about $170,000, to buy 30 sets of the armor for the testing.

Generally, during testing, various types of ammunition are fired at the vests, and the armor may also be subjected to extreme temperatures or environmental conditions. The body armor tests were done by H.P. White, an independent ballistic testing lab in Street, Maryland.

The Army has expressed great interest in getting more flexible bodyarmor. One of the key complaints about the armor used by troops on the battlefield is that it is too heavy and inflexible, and may lessen a soldier’s speed and agility. The current armor includes heavy hard armor in the front, back and sides.

The Dragon Skin testing was initially delayed because of a dispute over testing conditions between the Army and Pinnacle Armor of Fresno, Calif., which makes the protective gear known as Dragon Skin.

Earlier this week, the Army announced it would conduct three days of testing, signaling the dispute’s resolution.

A request for comment from Murray Neal, Pinnacle Armor’s chief executive officer, was not immediately returned.

Neal, however, has previously contended that his hard armor is high quality and its

“capabilities have been proven to be significant improvements over the current Army issue.”

He said he has nine years of ballistic data, both classified and unclassified, that show the armor taking over 40 rounds of ammunition from an AK-47, then another 150 rounds from a submachine gun, all at close range without any failure.

Dragon Skin Armor test

Body armor manufacturer worries that bullet proof vests may be tampered with before ballistic tests. A dispute over testing is stalling the Army’s plans to move ahead with buying a new high-tech body armor now off-limits to soldiers.

The stalemate is the latest development in a complex disagreement over the quality of the protective gear, known as Dragon Skin, that is made by Pinnacle Armor of Fresno, Calif. The fight over body armor has spread beyond the Pentagon and reverberated throughout the country as families try to buy the best protection possible for loved ones overseas.

Murray Neal, Pinnacle’s chief executive officer, said Friday he will not send the Army 30 vests to test next month, as planned, unless the Army agrees to his testing requirements.

Neal said he is worried the vests may be tampered with before the ballistic tests are conducted – potentially giving the Army an excuse not to buy from Pinnacle Armor.

“I’m not going to leave it to chance that they could mess with the body armor prior to it being tested and that could cause premature failure,” Neal said.

The Army says it has a contract for 30 vests and expects delivery. “The Army does not intend to make any changes to the contract that was signed,” Army spokeswoman Maj. Desiree Wineland said.

The Army has said it wants to buy the best protective gear possible, including the Dragon Skin vest, if the gear passes testing. The Pinnacle contract is only for the 30 vests for testing.

Pinnacle’s armor has been caught up in contradictory statements about its worthiness.

The Army last month banned soldiers from wearing it or any other military body armor not issued by the military. The Air Force, however, has ordered a number of the Dragon Skin vests.

According to a test-results memo obtained by the Associated Press, the armor stopped the “level three-plus” ammunition rounds for which it is rated. The armor did not do as well when more lethal ammunition was used – level four rounds the armor was not rated to stop.

Neal said there were problems with the hard armor inserts used in the vests. An earlier batch of the armor with different discs had stopped the higher powered shots, he said.

Army officials said last month they banned the use of nonmilitary issued armor because of concerns about reports that soldiers’ families were buying untested or inadequate armor for the troops.

Where You Can Find Us

OUR AUTHORS

0 POSTS0 COMMENTS
loading